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McCain’s Bogeyman Politics: The last refuge of a scoundrel

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It’s a bird! It’s a plane! A terrorist plane! An Arab! A Muslim! An Islamic extremist! A scary black man! A rock star! The anti-Christ! A commie! A socialist! A traitor! A treasonist! It’s un-American! It’s… it’s….

It’s election year.

And the McCain campaign, ever-desperate for something to run on besides their shoddily repackaged version of the Bush Administration, is grabbing at straws. As such, they’ve amassed the most reprehensible stump tactics in political history and repackaged them into a plank, of sorts: bogeyman politics. A scary mix of race-baiting, red-baiting and kitchen-sink demagoguery, bogeyman politics can turn a garden-variety politician into a scarecrow. By the same token, it can transform a great man into the very embodiment of terror: the bogeyman. History bears this out. The McCain-Palin bogeyman platform pays great tribute to the architects of fearmongering: Karl Rove, Lee Atwater, Westwood Pegler, Paul Joseph Goebbels, Joseph McCarthy and George Wallace.

And to anyone who would accuse Rep. John Lewis (GA) of going ‘over the line’ by mentioning George Wallace in his recent rebuke of McCain-Palin for “sowing the seeds of hatred and division” I would ask you to tell me: What are McCain, Palin, their surrogates and supporters doing — in both words and foulness of spirit — that is so different from what we saw during George Wallaces’s campaigns?  

Barack Obama is not even worthy to shine the shoes of John McCain. — PAC member, Deborah Johns, speaking from the pro-McCain-Palin “Stop Obama Tour” October 17, 2008

 

I’m a proponent of the “we must remember history, lest we repeat it” school of thought. Apparently, there are many in this country who have either forgotten, or they’re too young to own a visceral perspective of those bleak lessons that history has so painfully taught us over the past 60 years. Else, how could our media so easily disregard the McCain-Palin campaign’s flirtation with McCarthyism? And how could any American, except die-hard racists, embrace a platform that engages in the scary black man/scary Muslim race-baiting rhetoric (an amalgam of 1950s era racism and 21st century Muslim terrorist fearmongering)? How could anyone embrace a campaign that soils the character of a good man, based solely on the color of his skin and the unfortunate coincidence of his middle name?  

The history books will one day record the McCain-Palin campaign as being every bit as flagrantly ridiculous and dangerous as it truly is. The shame is that that we don’t recognize these destructive campaigns in their time. It is only in retrospect, years after the damage has been done. The demagogues of Nazi Germany, the McCarthy era and White Supremacy did not seize power overnight. That power had to be cultivated — word by word, fear by fear — conjuring forth the darkest elements of human nature to do war against imaginary evils. 

History tells the tale: good men and women can be drawn to do dark deeds, given the incentive of fear. While human beings may never lose their fear of the bogeyman — that amorphous being that hides in the shadows, in closets, under the bed at night and flies planes into buildings — we can choose to become more wise. Great leaders, like Obama, shed light into the dark places. Fools, like McCain/Palin, draw us further into the darkness. Wise men know the difference between the two camps. 

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Billboards showing Dr. King and Rosa Parks attending an integrated event at the Highlander Folk School in 1957 are erected across the South. To the white power structure, integration is a "communist plot" against the "Southern way of life." Therefore, anyone attending an integrated event was — by definition — a "communist."

Billboards, such as the one above, showing Dr. King and Rosa Parks attending an integrated event at the Highlander Folk School in 1957 were erected across the South. To the white power structure, integration was a “communist plot” against the “Southern way of life.” Therefore, anyone attending an integrated event was — by definition — a “communist.”

 

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by Mantis Katz for the canarypapers  

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Quotes and other foodstuffs for thought:

George Wallace was fond of red-baiting. In his 1963 inaugural speech, he compared fascist Germany to the Civil Rights movement, and he blamed desegregation and the Civil Rights movement on communism: 

This is the great freedom of our American founding fathers, but if we amalgamate [desegragate] into the one unit as advocated by the communist philosophers, then the enrichment of our lives, the freedom for our development, is gone forever….And may we take note of one other fact…. There are not enough native communists in the South to fill up a telephone booth. — George Wallace

 

They’re building a bridge over the Potomac for all the white liberals fleeing to Virginia. – George Wallace, 1968

I’ve lived here for at least 10 years and before that, about every third duty I was in either Arlington or Alexandria, up in communist country. —  John McCain’s brother, Joe, speaking about two Democratic-leaning areas in Northern Virginia, October 4, 2008

His voting record is more to the left than the announced socialist in the United States Senate, Bernie Sanders of Vermont. — John McCain, when asked if Obama is an extremist, July 17, 2008

I don’t know. All I know is his voting record, and that’s what people usually judge their elected representatives by.– John McCain (same interview) when asked if he thinks Obama is a socialist, July 17, 2008

His answer actually scared me even more… It’s kind of a socialist viewpoint. I don’t want to share my money with other people. That’s not the American dream. — Joe “the plumber” Wurzelbacher, reacting to his discussion on taxes with Barack Obama, October 14, 2008

Then the radical Islamists, the al Qaeda, the radical Islamists and their supporters, will be dancing in the streets in greater numbers than they did on Sept. 11 because they will declare victory in this War on Terror. – Rep. Steve King (R-Iowa) describing in March 2008 what would happen if Obama won the presidency

I’m going to tell you something: That boy’s finger does not need to be on the button. — Kentucky Rep. Geoff Davis (R) said of Obama, April 2008

Just from what little I’ve seen of her and Mr. Obama, Sen. Obama, they’re a member of an elitist-class individual that thinks that they’re uppity. — Georgia Republican Rep. Lynn Westmoreland, in comparing Michelle Obama to Sarah Palin, Sept 4, 2008

A few years later, he ran for the U.S. Senate. He won and has spent most of his time as a “celebrity senator.” No leadership or major legislation to speak of. His rise is remarkable in its own right – it’s the kind of thing that could happen only in America. — Rudy Giuliani, in his Sept. 2008 RNC convention speech, makes a subtle nod to Affirmative Action as the conduit to Obama’s rise in politics. 

He worked as a community organizer. — Rudy Giuliani on Barack Obama, Sept. 2008 RNC

This world of threats and dangers is not just a community, and it doesn’t just need an organizer. — Sarah Palin, Sept. 2008

I think God’s will has to be done in unifying people and companies to get that gas line built, so pray for that.Sarah Palin, June 2008

Our national leaders are sending U.S. soldiers on a task that is from God. — Sarah Palin, June 2008

As a Christian I have no duty to allow myself to be cheated, but I have the duty to be a fighter for truth and justice. — Aldolf Hitler

What does he actually seek to accomplish, after he’s done turning back the waters and healing the planet? The answer is to reduce the strength of America in a dangerous world. Terrorist states are seeking nuclear weapons without delay. He wants to meet them without preconditions. Al Qaeda terrorists still plot to inflict catastrophic harm on America. He’s worried that someone won’t read them their rights? – Sarah Palin on Obama, Sept. 2008

A writer observed: “We grow good people in our small towns, with honesty, sincerity, and dignity.” I know just the kind of people that writer had in mind…. They are the ones who do some of the hardest work in America … They love their country, in good times and bad, and they’re always proud of America.  – Sarah Palin at the Republican convention, Sept. 2008, quoting Westbrook Pegler, the racist, fascist, pro-Nazi, anti-semitic, pseudo-populist journalist/writer who openly wished for the assassinations of Franklin D. Roosevelt, John F. Kennedy and Robert Kennedy.

We believe that the best of America is not all in Washington, D.C. We believe…. We believe that the best of America is in these small towns that we get to visit, and in these wonderful little pockets of what I call the real America, being here with all of you hard working very patriotic, um, very, um, pro-America areas of this great nation. This is where we find the kindness and the goodness and the courage of everyday Americans. Those who are running our factories and teaching our kids and growing our food and are fighting our wars for us. Those who are protecting us in uniform. Those who are protecting the virtues of freedom. — Sarah Palin, explaining an early comment regardings areas of the country that are “pro-America” vs. those parts of America that are not. — Oct. 16, 2008

We believe also that there is a reason we all get teared-up when we hear Lee Greenwood sing about America, because we love America and we are always proud of being Americans. And we don’t apologize for being Americans. — Sarah Palin, October 16, 2008

McCarthyism is Americanism with its sleeves rolled. — Joseph McCarthy during the McCarthy era

I think it should be a states issue not a federal government, mandated, mandating yes or no on such an important issue. I’m in that sense a federalist, where I believe that states should have more say in the laws of their lands and individual areas. – Sarah Palin, October 2008

This nation was never meant to be a unit of one… This is the exact reason our freedom loving forefathers established the states, so as to divide the rights and powers among the states, insuring that no central power could gain master government control. — George Wallace, 1963 [EDITOR’S NOTE: The mention of ‘state’s rights’ has long been code for being anti-Civil Rights/white supremacy. This was a prominent component of George Wallace’s rhetoric, as he tried to assert the state’s right to preserve prejudice as in institution. The above is but one example, from one of his more famous speeches, delivered from the schoolhouse steps, as he physically blocked the door to bar black students from entering]

You start out in 1954 by saying, ‘Nigger, nigger, nigger.’ By 1968 you can’t say ‘nigger’ — that hurts you. Backfires. So you say stuff like forced busing, states’ rights and all that stuff. You’re getting so abstract now [that] you’re talking about cutting taxes, and all these things you’re talking about are totally economic things and a byproduct of them is [that] blacks get hurt worse than whites. And subconsciously maybe that is part of it. I’m not saying that. But I’m saying that if it is getting that abstract, and that coded, that we are doing away with the racial problem one way or the other. You follow me — because obviously sitting around saying, ‘We want to cut this,’ is much more abstract than even the busing thing, and a hell of a lot more abstract than ‘Nigger, nigger.’ — Lee Atwater, explaining the evolution of the GOP’s Southern strategy, 1981

This is not a man who sees America as you see it and how I see America. We see America as the greatest force for good in this world. – Sarah Palin on Obama,  October 2008 

Our opponent is someone who sees America it seems as being so imperfect that he’s palling around with terrorists who would target their own country.  — Sarah Palin, October 2008

My opponent’s touchiness every time he is questioned about his record should make us only more concerned. For a guy who’s already authored two memoirs, he’s not exactly an open book. It’s as if somehow the usual rules don’t apply, and where other candidates have to explain themselves and their records, Senator Obama seems to think he is above all that…. In short: Who is the real Barack Obama? — John McCain, Oct. 2008 [In short, McCain would like us ask ourselves, “Is Barack Hussein Obama a *real* American? Just who is this dark stranger? And what is this scary, black, Muslim-y terrorist-like guy going to do with our country if we elect him?”] 

I play to win. I do whatever it takes to win. If I have to fuck my opponent to win I’ll do it. If I have to destroy my opponent I won’t give it a second thought. — John McCain, spoken before a gathering of GOP operatives at the National Republican Senatorial Committee where McCain outlined his campaign strategy in his senate race.

 It is not truth that matters, but victory. — Adolf HItler

“Barack Obama’s friend tried to kill my family.” — from a McCain campaign press release, October 2008

If you tell a lie big enough and keep repeating it, people will eventually come to believe it. The lie can be maintained only for such time as the State can shield the people from the political, economic and/or military consequences of the lie. It thus becomes vitally important for the State to use all of its powers to repress dissent, for the truth is the mortal enemy of the lie, and thus by extension, the truth is the greatest enemy of the State. — Paul Joseph Goebbels on the power of propaganda

“Sit down, boy.” — Shouted at an African American media soundman by a Sarah Palin supporter during a rally  

“Kill him!” — shouted by a McCain-Palin supporter at a Palin rally, Oct. 2008

“Treason!” — shouted by a McCain-Palin supporter at a Palin rally, Oct. 2008

“Traitor!” — shouted by a McCain-Palin supporter at a Palin rally, Oct. 2008

“Off with his head!” — shouted by a McCain-Palin supporter at a Palin rally, Oct. 2008

“He’s an Arab!” — said by a McCain-Palin supporter at a McCain town hall meeting, Oct. 2008

“Commie faggot!” — shouted by a McCain-Palin supporter at a Palin rally, Oct. 2008

The great strength of the totalitarian state is that it forces those who fear it to imitate it. — Adolf Hitler

In the wake of their ongoing, indendiary rhetoric — along with the unchecked, ugly responses from the McCain-Palin rally audiences — Rep. John Lewis of Georgia issued a statement to the McCain campaign, adding his voice to the many, many others (colleagues, media figures and journalists, etc.) rebuking the campaign’s negative tactics. In Lewis’ statement, he reminded McCain of the historical precedence for violent repurcussions in the wake of such dangerous rhetoric. McCain took umbrage at this and chose to turn Rep. Lewis’ reprimand into an attack on Obama: 

Congressman John Lewis’ comments represent a character attack against Governor Sarah Palin and me that is shocking and beyond the pale. The notion that legitimate criticism of Senator Obama’s record and positions could be compared to Governor George Wallace, his segregationist policies and the violence he provoked is unacceptable and has no place in this campaign. I am saddened that John Lewis, a man I’ve always admired, would make such a brazen and baseless attack on my character and the character of the thousands of hardworking Americans who come to our events to cheer for the kind of reform that will put America on the right track. I call on Senator Obama to immediately and personally repudiate these outrageous and divisive comments that are so clearly designed to shut down debate 24 days before the election. Our country must return to the important debate about the path forward for America. — John McCain, Oct. 2008

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Perhaps, one day, John McCain will experience one of those death-bed conversions, similar to the one experienced by George Wallace, similar to the one Lee Atwater experienced while dying with a brain tumor. I’ve been around this world long enough to know that there are few burdens too heavy to bear. A heavy conscience is one of them 

I don’t know who will lead us through the ’90s, but they must be made to speak to this spiritual vacuum at the heart of American society, this tumor of the soul. It took a deadly illness to put me eye to eye with that truth, but it is a truth that the country, caught up in its ruthless ambitions and moral decay, can learn on my dime.

Mostly I am sorry for the way I thought of other people. Like a good general, I had treated everyone who wasn’t with me as against me…..My illness has taught me something about the nature of humanity, love, brotherhood and relationships that I never understood, and probably never would have. So, from that standpoint, there is some truth and good in everything. — Lee Atwater, 1990

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Monkeys with Molotovs: The gutter politics of McCain, Palin, Rove & Co.

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The monkeys are at it again. Lacking substantive issues on which to wage a presidential campaign, they’ve resorted to lobbing cheap incendiary devices at their opponent, in the hope that one will hit the mark and bring Obama’s candidacy down in flames. Fact is, on the issues, the McCain ticket had already self-destructed before Sarah Palin arrived on the scene. Bereft of anything to offer, other than a shoddily re-packaged version of the fatally flawed Bush Administration, the McCain team has long since lost credibility as an agent of change, maverick or otherwise.

Palin’s addition to the ticket adds nothing, beyond the squallorous baggage of her lie and scandal-ridden Alaska politics, which have perversely served to polarize this country even further from discussing solutions to the calamitous problems we face. Here, the McCain-Palin political team is proving to be a perfect match, uniquely-suited to make a seamless transition from the Bush-Cheney years. Neither McCain nor Palin has enough respect for the merit of their own credentials to run on them, so they’ve instead reinvented and embellished their records, weaving a myth, of sorts, that they are all-American mavericks, set to shake-up Washington politics, even as their campaign — run by Bush-league lobbyists and Karl Rove minions — is exactly what has so infected Washington politics over the past 8 years. Neither candidate has enough respect for their self-described maverick credentials, because neither can prove that they are any different from the same-old, same-old reckless cowboys, not mavericks, that have been running this country for the past 8 years.

 McCain’s voting record, particularly over the past 4 years, has been lockstep with Bush-Cheney. His spell as a maverick with the Bush Administration happened only briefly, after the 2000 election, when a bruised McCain was so angry at Bush, he considered switching parties as payback. Despite that his maverick record doesn’t even exist, he runs on the claim, bolstering it with self-serving reminders of his military service, which he delivers in the countless wrenching retellings of his POW experiences — stories which, in the minds of many fellow vets, play more like shameless pandering, as John McCain’s own voting record on veteran issues is no less than deplorable. Palin, for her part, brings to the ticket a thin career in Alaska politics, riddled with lies, cronyism and scandal.

Neither Palin nor McCain have shown that they own the scruples or vision to think outside of their narrow worldviews long enough to consider that they are running for high office in a country that has been left bleeding, in shambles, from the collateral damage of the past 8 years under the Bush-Cheney Administration. Neither candidate has bothered to take notice that the last thing this bleeding country needs is more blood. Yet, the two candidates are nothing, if not shrewd. They both know that — when it comes to influencing people — if you scare the hell out of them, you can bring them, lockstep, into your camp, so long as you promise to protect them. Bush, Cheney, Rove & Co. were masters at this tactic.

 

Sad thing is — and despite that this tactic is cheap, ugly and transparent to many Americans — this tactic really, truly works on a large number of voters. And the beauty of it is that, the dirtier the tactics, the better the trap they lay for their opponent. We’ve seen this over the past 12 days, as the McCain camp’s dirty bombs have escalated, leaving Obama but two choices: respond in kind, or take the high road, adhering to the strength of his issues and the authenticity of his campaign. Translated, in Rovesque terms, this means that Obama has a choice between appearing either weak or tough on terror. And, make no mistake, the McCain-Palin tactics more closely resemble terrorist tactics than the strategy of respectable, statured politicians trying to win an election. (To see an example of the latter, you’d have to study the example of the Obama campaign over the past 18 months). The only hope for the McCain-Palin team is that they can lure Obama into an even bigger trap, in which dirty does battle with dirty. And, as anyone in Washington can tell you, there’s no one can trump Rove when it comes to dirty politics.

Excerpt from an interview with McCain on Karl Rove tactics:
QUESTION: His tactics don’t, you don’t disapprove of them? They don’t make you nervous?

MCCAIN: It’s not so much whether I approve of his tactics or not. It’s that he has a very good, great political mind. Any information or advice and council he can give us, I’d be glad to have. I don’t think anybody denies his talents. So I’d be glad to get any advice and council. We would obviously decide whether to accept it or not.

 

McCain and Palin have shown their adeptness at playing gutter politics, with no lie, no slander, no blow too low or too outrageous, so long it serves to discredit their opponent or scare the American people. After all, their team includes Karl Roves brightest protege, a man named Steve Schmidt, a master of gutter politics. McCain and Palin have also shown that they are adept at waging a petty, senseless, pre-emptive gutter war — a war waged for the sole benefit of their campaign agenda, at the expense of everyday Americans who are facing calamitous changes in their lives.  Will these same Americans take the bait, as they’ve done for the past 8 years? Are Americans still so blinded by swaggering bravado, that they see strength in a leader throwing gasoline on a fire? Will they again choose the monkeys with Molotovs, or will they choose the candidate who’s fighting like hell to wage a campaign that offers tangible solutions to the very real and tangible problems we face as Americans? Only time will tell.

 

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by Mantis Katz, for the canarypapers

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For more reading:

New York Magazine: The Low Road Warrior – Many of McCain’s advisers from 2000, such as John Weaver and Mike Murphy, express qualms about the campaign’s newly nasty tone. (One can only imagine the sigh of relief emanating from Mark McKinnon, the heralded adman who helped McCain win the nomination but whose aversion to taking a cleaver to Obama caused him to sit out the general.)

Huffington Post: While Rome Burned… They Talked About Lipstick

Huffington Post: Bob Cesca: Fooled Again

A VIDEO COMPENDIUM: Sarah Palin — Maverick executive or just another cowboy?

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McCain and the rest of the Republican Party have been talking feverishly — in tongues, at times — to convince America and the rest of the free world that Sarah Palin was the best possible choice for the McCain ticket. “Her record as a maverick executive speaks for itself!” they say. And we couldn’t agree more. Honestly.

ABOVE: (audio) Sarah Palin giggles as shock jock, Bob Lester, insults Alaska State Senate President, Lydia Green, calling her a “jealous woman,” a “bitch” and “a cancer” (even as it was well-known that Sen. Green is a cancer survivor). Then Lester ridicules the Senator’s weight, in a reference to the size of her chair. Ms. Palin’s only response during this clip (besides the giggles) was to tell Lester, “We’d be honored to have you guys,” when he asked about coming to visit Palin. An Anchorage Daily News op-ed called Palin’s behavior, “plain and simple one of the most unprofessional, childish and inexcusable performances I’ve ever seen from a politician.”

ABOVE: On a lighter note, here’s the classic, Sarah Palin question: “What is it, exactly, that the VP does every day?”

ABOVE: A video on aerial shooting of wolves in Alaska, along with a call to Governor Palin (who supports this brutal program) to stop supporting this program.

ABOVE: Ah, Troopergate… Abuse of power or maverick, executive decision? You decide.

ABOVE: We suspect that Joe Lieberman is the scarf man with the scary voice in this Palin expose.

ABOVE: Would win 1st Prize in our Sarah Palin Maverick Impersonator pageant.

ABOVE: Okay, so this isn’t Sarah, either. Or is it?  (Compare Miss SC Teen USA’s discourse with Sarah Palin’s ruminations on oil and the Iraq War: “When I talk about, umm, the plan for the war, you know, let’s make sure we have a plan here, and respecting McCain’s position on that.”)

 

HERE’S WHAT THE OTHERS ARE SAYING:

ABOVE: Jack Cafferty (Tell us what you really think, Jack!)

ABOVE: Bill Maher

Karl Rove disses Virginia Gov. Tim Kaine’s credentials (a Harvard law school grad, who has been governor for 3 years) as being inadequte for the VP slot. Wonder if Karl Rove has any thoughts on Sarah Palin’s credentials?

ABOVE: James Carville & McCain campaign adviser, Nancy Pfotenhauer (feverishly making a case for Palin) weigh in on Larry King. Unlike Obama, seen on this clip, Pfotenhauer can’t seem to bring herself to show even a mote of graciousness. The lady doth protest too much.

 

ABOVE: Keith Olbermann & Rachel Maddow talk about Palin’s record

ABOVE: Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert (Daily Show/Colbert Report) Talk Palin

–> CLICK HERE TO BE TRANSMOGRAPHIED TO THE COMEDY CENTRAL SITE <–

ABOVE: Comedy Central/Daily Show — Karl Rove, Dick Morris, Nancy Pfotenhauer and Sarah Palin, herself, play the old double standard, pitting Sarah Palin vs. Tim Kaine, Jamie Lynn Spears and Hillary Clinton   

ABOVE: From MSNBC, conservative commentators, Noonan and Murphy, after they’re’re off the air (and not aware their mikes are still live), say what they really think about the veep choice.

ABOVE: CNN’s Roland Martin rips Palin’s ridicule of community organizers.

LASTLY…. A FEW LINKS:

What’s up with this? Early in her tenure as mayor of Wasilla, Sarah Palin was nearly recalled for firing the police chief and the town librarian. Not because they were doing a bad job, nor (heaven forbid) because both had supported Palin’s opponent in the mayoral election (and, according to other sources, because the librarian resisted Palin’s “rhetorical question” about censorship/removing *certain books from the library and because the police chief changed a local bar’s closing hour from 5 a.m. to earlier, due to rowdiness). According to Palin, however, she didn’t feel she had their full support. ”You know in your heart when someone is supportive of you,” she said. Perhaps this was also a factor in her firing of Alaska’s public safety commissioner, Walt Monegan, after his refusal to fire Palin’s ex-brother-in-law.   http://www.washingtonindependent.com/3671/the-reform-candidate

Politico: Why the Media Should Apologize – On behalf of the media, I would like to say we are sorry. On behalf of the elite media, I would like to say we are very sorry. We have asked questions this week that we should never have asked. We have asked pathetic questions like: Who is Sarah Palin? What is her record? Where does she stand on the issues? And is she is qualified to be a heartbeat away from the presidency? We have asked mean questions like: How well did John McCain know her before he selected her? How well did his campaign vet her? And was she his first choice….

McClatchy: Official: Palin’s never issued an order to Alaska Guard

SameFacts.com: Palin vs. Reality: Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not his own facts.

TIME: Swampland/Angry Amateurs: The story of the day out here in Minneapolis is the McCain campaign’s war against the press. This has been building for some time. Those of us who have criticized the candidate–and especially those of us who enjoyed good relations with McCain in the past–have been subject to off-the-record browbeating and attempted bullying all year. But things have gotten much worse in recent days: there was McCain’s rude, bizarre interview with Time Magazine last week. Yesterday, McCain refused to an interview with Larry King, for God’s sake, because Campbell Brown had been caught in the commission of journalism on CNN the night before….

Careful, you angry elitist democrats out there…. according to the latest Rasmussen Reports poll, if the media criticizes Sarah Palin, it makes people want to vote for her even more: Over half of U.S. voters (51%) think reporters are trying to hurt Sarah Palin with their news coverage, and 24% say those stories make them more likely to vote for Republican presidential candidate John McCain in November.

CBS News: Fake Soldiers Used In RNC Video: It was a video that was supposed to elicit soaring patriotism and real emotions about the Pledge of Allegiance. But to do that, it used fake soldiers and a staged military funeral instead of the real thing. (good news is, no soldiers were harmed during the filming of this video, eh?)

LosAngelesTimes: Palin: wrong woman, wrong message – Sarah Palin shares nothing but a chromosome with Hillary Clinton. She is Phyllis Schlafly, only younger.

ABC News: Fired Alaskan Official Says Palin Hasn’t Been Truthful – The fired Alaskan official, whose dismissal has become the subject of a state senate committee’s investigation of Gov. Sarah Palin, has told ABC News that she has not been entirely truthful on the matter.

fivethirtyeight: Cognitive Dissonance – Virtually all of the conservative commentariat, and a greater-than-would-care-to-admit-it share of the liberal commentariat think that Sarah Palin hit a home run tonight. I guess I’m just going to have to stick my neck out (along with Josh Marshall) and disagree. (p.s. this website, which bills its goods as “electoral projections done right,” is a great site for tracking and comparison)

WashingtonMonthly: Factchecking Palin – I thought Palin’s speech was quite good: well-written, well delivered. And, as I said earlier, I think she’s a genuinely engaging person, and comes across very well. There were just a couple of problems. One, which I have seen people notice, but which I suspect won’t be a big deal for a lot of voters, is that it had very little substance. The other, which the commenters I saw on TV for some reason neglected to mention, was that she told a lot of lies. (Note: the lies are listed, with reponsible updates given, where applicable).

AnchorageDailyNews: Some of Palin’s remarks stretch the truth – SPEECH: Gas pipeline, earmark issues have more subtlety than described. Gov. Sarah Palin’s remarks to the Republican National Convention about her record in state government stretched the truth.